Guild experience – Cataclysm: how to earn it and how to level your guild fast in Cata

MMO players have long been used to the idea of earning experience to advance their own characters, but with the addition of Guild experience, Cataclysm has given us a whole new way of advancing. If you’re in a small guild struggling to boost your levels, or if you’re a guildmaster looking to optimize the efforts of your guildies, this short guide will help you get the most of WoW’s new guild experience mechanic.

Your guild, rather like your character, now has a level. A new guild starts at level 1, and the maximum level attainable is currently level 25. The higher the level, the more perks your guild members will have access to. These perks range from the purely cosmetic, such as new vanity pets and mounts, to the pragmatically useful – for example, guilds which hit a certain level gain the ability to mass resurrect entire raids, or have their repair bills automatically slashed or their hearthstone cooldown times reduced. There are plenty of reasons to try to level your guild, and even the lower levels give immediately useful benefits.

Your character even has a reputation with your guild, just as she has a reputation with the many factions in-game. The best guild rewards are only available to players whose guild reputation is Exalted. Earning guild experience will automatically raise your personal guild reputation, as well as contributing towards the earned experience of your guild as a whole (and bringing you all a bit closer to the next guild level).

As one might expect, leveling a guild is a cooperative task which will require all your guildies to work together. Each guild member earns guild experience, and there’s a cap of 6,246k xp on the amount of guild experience a guild can gain in one day.

How to gain experience for your guild

Many of the day-to-day tasks which you’re probably already performing in WoW will award guild experience as well as any other rewards.

  • Completing quests will reward guild experience (in additional to any standard experience which would be awarded). If your character is level 85 and therefore no longer earns standard experience from questing, completing quests will still reward guild experience. The amount of guild experience awarded is 25% of the amount of standard XP awarded.
  • Completing daily quests also awards guild experience. At maximum level, this is one of the best ways to earn guild experience. Again, the guild XP awarded is based on the standard XP.
  • Successfully killing a boss in a dungeon will reward guild experience, but only if the majority of the party is from the same guild – pugging a random dungeon or raid on your own gets you nowhere. Killing a boss in a 5-man group will grant 18600 guild XP (per player) if two other party members are from your guild. With three fellow guildies, the amount increases to 37200 XP per player, and if all five members of the party are from the same guild the amount earned per boss kill is 46500.
  • Killing a raid boss awards 78700 guild XP per person, if sufficient guild members are present. For a 10-man raid, you’ll need at least 8 guildies. For a 25-man raid, at least 20 raiders need to be guilded.
  • A winning arena team will earn experience for their guild, but only if all members of the team are from the same guild. The amount of XP earned in this case is 138,800 XP per player.
  • A rated Battleground win will also award guild experience. Each Honor Point gained will also award 10 guild experience. In addition, a rated battleground win will also award guild experience, but only if at least 8 members of the team are from the same guild. There’s still some debate as to exactly how much XP is awarded in this case.

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How quickly can we advance?

The daily experience cap puts an effective limit on the speed at which your guild will be able to advance. Getting from level 1 to level 2 requires just over 16,500k xp. With the daily cap at just over 6000k xp, it’ll take you three days to gain your first guild level even if you earn the maximum amount of experience you possibly can. Don’t despair, though – guild experience is comparatively easy to come by, so even a leisurely-paced guild should find themselves naturally climbing up the rankings.

Take a look at this fantastic series of forum posts by Bregdark, which break down the specific numbers in excruciating detail.

The most efficient way to advance

If you want to hit Guild level 25 as soon as possible, you’re going to want to hit the guild experience cap every day. The most efficient way to do that partially depends on your playstyle and the size of your guild, but in most cases raids and dungeons are the best way to go.

As a rough guideline, if your guild can kill a raid boss in the amount of time it would take to kill two dungeon bosses, raiding will be the most efficient thing to do. If not, split the raid into five groups of 5 (or two groups of 5 for a 10-man raid) and run heroic dungeons instead. Of course, each raid boss can only be killed once per week, so you have to resort to dungeon boss kills eventually anyway. If you can complete Lost City Of The Tolvir in less time that it would take you to down any two raid bosses, you’ll be better off running dungeons. Remember to take raid trash into account when estimating your timing!

Be sure to keep an eye on the guild experience cap. Any activity after you hit the cap is wasted. It’s important to note, though, that the guild experience cap is removed once you hit guild level 20, so once you’ve reached 20 you can happily grind until your fingers fall off.

Guild leveling! Huh! Good God, y’all – what is it good for?

Absolutely everything.

The benefits of guild advancement are numerous. Each additional guild level provides a new “perk”, which will automatically apply to all your guild members. These perks include:

  • An increase to amount of experience or reputation gained from killing monsters and completing quests.
  • Items taking less durability loss when you die (giving all your guildies lower repair bills).
  • An extra bit of cash being automatically deposited in your guild bank every time a guild member loots cash from a mob.
  • Hearthstone cooldowns being reduced for every guild member.
  • Mail sent between guild members arriving instantly.

… and much more besides. Wowwiki has an excellent detailed list of guild perks available at each level.

Additional guild perks

As well as allowing guilds to advance by earning experience, Cataclysm also brought with it the ability for guilds to earn Achievements in just same way as players. These guild achievements usually require the cooperation of several (if not all) guild members. In addition to the benefits gained each time the guild advances a level, there are a variety of other perks and items to which you’ll have access, depending on your personal guild reputation and whether or not you’ve accomplished some of these guild achievements.

The additional rewards available from guild achievements include Heirloom items, vanity pets and mounts. If your guild manages to hit the maximum Guild Level of 25, for example, you’ll be able to purchase the undeniably awesome Reins of the Kor’kron Annihilator if you’re a Horde guild, or the almost-as-awesome-but-not-quite Reins of the Golden King for Alliance guilds.

No matter how you like to play the game, whether you’re a loner quietly grinding quests and professions, or a dedicated raider never far from your guildies’ sides, you’ll be able to earn guild experience whilst carrying on with your favorite guild activities. Since guild experience benefits everyone, there’s no reason not to start building it up right now.

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You’ve Got Less Power To Kick From LFD Groups. Discuss.

Polish your boot ‘cos it looks like you’re not going to be doing much else with it in random dungeon finder groups anymore. Blizzard announced some changes to the LFD kick facility the other day – Cryptic over at Blessing of the Grove has picked up on it and is taking a closer look.

I imagine Cryptic scratching his head as he wrote this post. It reads like he’s thinking out loud, trying to understand the changes. There are several changes to who can kick, when, and what the penalties for kicking someone will be, and in each case Cryptic’s going through and talking about whether he thinks it’s a good change.

Most of the changes are directed at guild groups and seemed designed to make it more difficult for them to remove another player who is placed with them in the dungeon finder. I have a problem with most of these changes mainly because Blizzard is trying to ‘fix’ player behavior by addressing the people around those players rather than addressing the problem directly. It feels like they are punishing players for queuing with others who have the same goals.

I agree with both his overall conclusion and quite a few of his assessments on individual changes. He illustrates the problems with the new rule about people who group with tank or healers being kicked from a group along with them particularly well. Personally I only kick randoms from a guild group if they’re acting like a right nitwibbler. Like Cryptic I’m feeling slightly persecuted for daring to run with a group of friends and, as Cryptic ponders, wondering what the extra penalties Blizzard have mentioned will be.

What do you think – are these dungeon finder tweaks counter-intuitive to the guild system or are they good protective measures that needed adding to the LFD tool?

_Quote taken directly from Cryptic’s post

You can find Cryptic’s Blessing of the Grove homepage here_

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Wiping – Why It’s Like Marmite

My guild’s been merrily wiping on Cataclysm’s endgame content. Our bodyparts have got to know the walls, floor and sometimes ceilings pretty well by now – wiping’s almost muscle memory. I suspect you know the feeling whatever level you’re at, right? Well, Gnomeaggedon might as well have read my mind today about the whole wiping thing, as his post about the whole malarky made me smile.

In a nutshell? Gnomeaggedon thinks wiping’s great. But I’m guessing not everyone likes it. Bit like marmite.

Maybe not so much in a PuG, but certainly from within the safety of a guild or friend group.

It’s not something I have experienced in a while, appreciating a wipe, but Cataclysm has brought that back to the game.

Whether it’s in a raid due to inexperience, raid composition or even complete personal stuff up (admit it we all have them, that’s why the dance is so beautiful when we all move in step with no toes trodden).

Gnomeaggedon goes through all of the types of group content, from raids and dungeons to battlegrounds, and celebrates the wipes he’s experienced in each of them. And y’know, the way he writes it, it does sound like he’s having fun. I agree with him. It’s kind of fun to wipe in a group of friends or guildies. It’s as though the increased difficulty since Wrath has given us a much needed reality check and it’s possible to go “ohh wait, it’s a game, meant to be fun! Right!”

Though the concept of wiping in a PuG rather than a friend/guild group sticks out like a sore thumb from Gnomeaggedon’s post and that, too, is worth a look – could we learn to love PuG wipes or are they just too excruciating?

_Quote taken directly from Gnomeaggedon’s post

You can find Gnomeaggedon’s_ Armageddon’s Coming! _homepage here_

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Beruthiel: How To Prepare Your Guild For Cataclysm

Guilds can flounder as a new expansion arrives, and Cataclysm’s changes are going to shake things up for guilds more than before. So Beruthiel’s survival guide on preparing your guild for Cataclysm couldn’t have come at a better time.

Her guild focuses mostly on raiding guilds but her advice is so grounded that you could use it whatever sort of guild you have. She talks about what a guild’s leadership need to do before an expansion: most of her tips can be boiled down as “communicate with your guild!”

The first, and probably most important, thing that you should do is share with your guild what it is that you intend to do in the expansion. If you are a 25 man guild now, do you intend to continue to raid as a 25 man guild with the new expansion? Do you plan on swapping to 10s? If so, how are you going to pare your 25 man roster down to a 10 man roster?

Uncertainty tends to make many people nervous. As such, don’t leave your members blind, floundering, and uncertain! Let them know what your plans are, and how they are going to fit into those plans! It doesn’t have to be anything fancy…

But Beru’s written her guide almost as a check list, with exact information on what sort of dialogue needs to be happening in a guild. Right now. Yes, she even gives advice on when to start – and finish – organising for Cataclysm. She also looks at thorny topics like how to deal with players who want to change mains or how to encourage players to work together.

Beru’s written from experience of doing this in her own guild, which means she knows what she’s talking about when she says doing these steps will boost morale in some way or another. Which, going into a new dragon-menaced age where we’re all quaking in our boots, is a Good Thing.

What about you – are you helping your guild prepare, or is everything quiet, too quiet?

_Quote taken directly from Beru’s post

You can find Falling Leaves And Wings’ homepage here_

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Roundup: What's In A Guild?

Your guild. Is it the right one for you? You don’t have to answer that right now, but deep down you know one way or another. And it’s a topic that’s been going the rounds this week, with three very different articles cropping up on the radar.

  • First up is Gloomlion from the Green Rune, who’s reposted his old guide to finding the right guild for you on his new blog. It might be old but it’s still very well written and relevant. Gloom takes you through the steps to get into the guild you want, which includes asking some honest questions of yourself.
  • Rhii over at her new blog Oh My, Kurenai is having a tough time matching her own gameplay needs with her boyfriend’s. She talks about the journey they’ve both been on to try to find a guild that feels like home, and how difficult it can be to juggle two peoples’ wishes in-game. It’s times like this when it’s not just a game but a shared hobby that brings joy for different reasons, and it can be hard to fit those in while also finding a guild that’s right and will take on people who come as a ‘package’.
  • Lara of Root and Branch has a post in response to Rhii’s. She says there are a few tell-tale signs of a guild or raid team crumbling, and from her own experience people bringing alts to progression runs is one of them. A lot of us can probably sympathise – I know I can, having seen people loose interest in raids for whatever reason.

What all of these articles show is that while a guild is a home, we could do with occasionally taking a step back and asking ourselves if this is still what we want from the game. Hard to do, perhaps, but better for everyone?

What do you think, would people be happier if they reviewed their guild situation occasionally rather than just staying put?

You can find…

  • _The Green Rune’s homepage here_
  • _Oh My, Kurenai’s homepage here_
  • _Root And Branch’s homepage here_
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Roundup: What’s In A Guild?

Your guild. Is it the right one for you? You don’t have to answer that right now, but deep down you know one way or another. And it’s a topic that’s been going the rounds this week, with three very different articles cropping up on the radar.

  • First up is Gloomlion from the Green Rune, who’s reposted his old guide to finding the right guild for you on his new blog. It might be old but it’s still very well written and relevant. Gloom takes you through the steps to get into the guild you want, which includes asking some honest questions of yourself.
  • Rhii over at her new blog Oh My, Kurenai is having a tough time matching her own gameplay needs with her boyfriend’s. She talks about the journey they’ve both been on to try to find a guild that feels like home, and how difficult it can be to juggle two peoples’ wishes in-game. It’s times like this when it’s not just a game but a shared hobby that brings joy for different reasons, and it can be hard to fit those in while also finding a guild that’s right and will take on people who come as a ‘package’.
  • Lara of Root and Branch has a post in response to Rhii’s. She says there are a few tell-tale signs of a guild or raid team crumbling, and from her own experience people bringing alts to progression runs is one of them. A lot of us can probably sympathise – I know I can, having seen people loose interest in raids for whatever reason.

What all of these articles show is that while a guild is a home, we could do with occasionally taking a step back and asking ourselves if this is still what we want from the game. Hard to do, perhaps, but better for everyone?

What do you think, would people be happier if they reviewed their guild situation occasionally rather than just staying put?

You can find…

  • _The Green Rune’s homepage here_
  • _Oh My, Kurenai’s homepage here_
  • _Root And Branch’s homepage here_
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Kurn's Corner Does Guild Relationships

Guilds are wonderful things. I’ve always said so myself, but sometimes I feel like I’m the gummy granny maundering between naps and horlicks infusions from the heap of blankets in the corner. Personally I don’t mind that given I like naps and probably horlicks too, but still. Today hope has been restored to me, thanks to Kurn’s article on Guild relationships.

Sure, posts about guilds being happy, fuzzy bundles of people aren’t new. Neither would it be a surprise to see a flood of them as the half-formed monster that is Cataclysm moves haphazardly closer to squish some of the myriad of guilds. But Kurn’s managed to strike a fine balance between wandering for a trip down memory lane rejoicing in the company of her guildmates [pullquote]These are the people … [who’re] not going to show up at your front door with an actual axe[/pullquote]while, you know, nailing up a few of the main culprits of relationship tropes that guilds should keep a watchful eye on.

It all hinges on her free-for-all with personal experience. At every turn Kurn gives examples of things that have happened to her. What makes it work is how well she’s chosen her examples: they ring true both as authentic personal experiences and as archetypal yep we’ve all at least heard of that if not weathered it ourselves, such as the upheaval of the “Guildmaster and the Shadowpriest”. That’s almost folklore semantics: we might not realise it but these things are fast becoming the external mythos of WoW.

Saying that, Kurn could have looked at a few other varieties of relationships. I probably wouldn’t have picked up on this so sharply had Kurn not done so herself, but it looks like she stopped herself before she went for a lengthy examination of some of the less trumpeted in-guild relationships. It’s a shame as some of them would’ve made for hearty debate points in [pullquote]There are other relationships to explore … But those examinations will have to wait until another time[/pullquote]juxtaposition to the ones she did cover. Perhaps she’s got it in mind to do a part 2 – I’m kind of hoping so. Not hinting or anything, Kurn!

Meanwhile, what do you think – are there certain in-guild relationships that never get prodded under the microscope and you think should be, or is all this carebear “yay I <3 my guild” stuff poppycock in your opinion? Hmm.. I see t-shirts and beanie hats in that slogan’s future…

_Quotes direct from Kurn’s post – her homepage is here.

_

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Kurn’s Corner Does Guild Relationships

Guilds are wonderful things. I’ve always said so myself, but sometimes I feel like I’m the gummy granny maundering between naps and horlicks infusions from the heap of blankets in the corner. Personally I don’t mind that given I like naps and probably horlicks too, but still. Today hope has been restored to me, thanks to Kurn’s article on Guild relationships.

Sure, posts about guilds being happy, fuzzy bundles of people aren’t new. Neither would it be a surprise to see a flood of them as the half-formed monster that is Cataclysm moves haphazardly closer to squish some of the myriad of guilds. But Kurn’s managed to strike a fine balance between wandering for a trip down memory lane rejoicing in the company of her guildmates [pullquote]These are the people … [who’re] not going to show up at your front door with an actual axe[/pullquote]while, you know, nailing up a few of the main culprits of relationship tropes that guilds should keep a watchful eye on.

It all hinges on her free-for-all with personal experience. At every turn Kurn gives examples of things that have happened to her. What makes it work is how well she’s chosen her examples: they ring true both as authentic personal experiences and as archetypal yep we’ve all at least heard of that if not weathered it ourselves, such as the upheaval of the “Guildmaster and the Shadowpriest”. That’s almost folklore semantics: we might not realise it but these things are fast becoming the external mythos of WoW.

Saying that, Kurn could have looked at a few other varieties of relationships. I probably wouldn’t have picked up on this so sharply had Kurn not done so herself, but it looks like she stopped herself before she went for a lengthy examination of some of the less trumpeted in-guild relationships. It’s a shame as some of them would’ve made for hearty debate points in [pullquote]There are other relationships to explore … But those examinations will have to wait until another time[/pullquote]juxtaposition to the ones she did cover. Perhaps she’s got it in mind to do a part 2 – I’m kind of hoping so. Not hinting or anything, Kurn!

Meanwhile, what do you think – are there certain in-guild relationships that never get prodded under the microscope and you think should be, or is all this carebear “yay I <3 my guild” stuff poppycock in your opinion? Hmm.. I see t-shirts and beanie hats in that slogan’s future…

_Quotes direct from Kurn’s post – her homepage is here.

_

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