WoW Roundup: Luck Tested, Player Wealth and more

by on November 12, 2012


Exciting times in WoW right now, between the new raids and the upcoming patch! And blog activity’s reflecting that – there’s a lot of good writing out there.

At the same time, it’s not all happy – but whether you want to read scientific (ish) testing of WoW superstitions, or a well-considered essay on why one veteran player’s quitting the game, it’s all here:

  • We don’t usually link to “I’m quitting WoW” posts, but Kurn’s epic discussion and analysis of the game and her relation with it is fascinating reading – FAR from the usual “I quit” post (earlier parts here“I didn’t just become a raider. I became a raid leader. I became a healing lead. I became a guild master. I became a WoW blogger. I became a WoW podcaster. World of Warcraft has been a great place for me to hang out for seven years. “
  • Saxsy writes a very useful guide for any AH player to the uses or lack therof of MoP gems“A lot of gems here reflect the primacy of hit and spirit. Like the blue ones above, I expect these to become less popular as gear gets better and these stats become less useful. For now, though, these gems actually sell pretty well, which is a refreshing change from Cataclysm, where the best price you could get for a green gem was from the vendor.”
  • The Grumpy Elf wanted more luck – so he tested out some of the methods that other players swear make WoW’s RNG kinder“So many people relay stories exactly like this, so is it possible that there is something to it? It seems to work the same with BoP patterns in raids. If a blacksmith BoP pattern drops from the raid and there are no blacksmiths in the raid expect to see a lot of them. If there are a few, expect to see none.”
  • The Godmother writes a really great post about the impact when your play isn’t up to scratch, and how we – and she – copes with it“There is a very good reason why L2P can be as abusive a phrase as it is. If you can, then it is likely you will never understands the issues that arise if you can’t. Knowing you can’t, and admitting that fact is often very difficult.”
  • Beruthiel channels Dr Seuss for a parable about the current state of the healing druid“The Lorax said, “Sir! You are crazy, my friend. There is no one on earth who will use them in the end!”. The crab laughed at the Lorax, “You poor stupid guy! You will use them, and like it, or just manage to get by”.”
  • And Eric Dekker reveals the results of his 2012 Warcraft Wealth survey in a long, fascinating post“Given the results of this year’s survey the calculate Gini Index, the measurement of inequality where 0% is perfect equality and 100% is perfect inequality, for the World of Warcraft population is 75.9, a raise of 10.4 points over 2011’s results. To give some scale to the disparity if Azeroth was a country it would have the most inequality in the world, doing even worse than Namibia which has a 74.3. “

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Balkoth November 13, 2012 at 6:52 am

Speaking of Kurn, a response to her initial post that she decided not to allow on her site, apparently:

First, I’m the GM of a 10 man heroic raiding guild that raids two nights a week (despotism.enjin.com). We formed at the very end of WotLK and built up our roster during t11. We killed Heroic Ragnaros about two months before 4.3 hit and killed Heroic Madness the day of the 10% nerf. We had a 2% wipe at the 5% nerf which was heartbreaking. After that, we went back and cleared the entire place at 0% nerf (we were 6/8H pre-nerf, for reference) to prove we could and because we were really annoyed with the rapid nerfs. In short, if anything you’d think I’d be the most against nerfs because of our limited schedule and we want to beat the content at 0%.

But I’m not. Well, I’m against the incredibly rapid nerfs of Dragon Soul, but I’m not against them in general.

The fundamental question to me is: what happens when you reach your limit?

In other words, what happens when a guild faces a boss it simply cannot defeat. The raid team as a whole simply isn’t skilled enough to beat the boss, even with gear from months of farming. It simply won’t make enough of a difference, the people just are not good enough. To be clear, I am *not* talking about being able to overcome the boss with some extra gear in a few weeks (or even month or two). It’s a situation where you’re wiping on Heroic Ultraxion at 20% and you can only get 15% more DPS from gear eventually.

A guild in such a situation has two options:

1, replace people. Easier said than done, especially when friends are involved. And again, we’re not talking a top world guild here. Attracting capable recruits can be incredibly hard and drama can easily arise from someone being told “Sorry, you seriously just need to pull 5% more DPS or we can’t beat this boss.”

2, stop trying. In other words, be content with being 1/8H in Dragon Soul for 6+ months.

The former breaks social bonds that Blizzard wants to preserve in these guilds because it’s one of the strongest ways to keep people subscribed. The latter gets people to quit the game since there’s no forward momentum. Neither of these solutions is ideal. Blizzard wants these less skilled players to be able to still get a feeling of progression instead of saying “Well, we came as far as we can, might as well quit until the next raid tier.” So they slowly (hopefully) but steadily nerf the raid. In theory, people who are serious get done with everything before nerfs hit and anyone who wasn’t done wouldn’t have finished anyway (again, in theory).

This obviously does have the effect of it being less respectable to finish a tier only partly. My guild, in the midst of being formed, only went 7/13H in tier 11, but we were proud of it. Had we formed in Dragon Soul (or in future tiers), there would be an expectation that we’d be 8/8H by the end. But I think Blizzard’s concerned with the guilds that would simply give up without nerfs since they’d literally hit a brick wall (for THEIR guild) and potentially quit. So Blizzard tries to let them see more content via slow nerfs.

If the DS nerfs had started at the beginning of May, would your guild have been as upset (that would have given you 5 months instead of 2 months at 0%, and yes, the fact that those 2 months included holidays really sucked)?

Note that no one is really up in arms about people clearing t11 in t12 or t13 gear. I don’t really see the slow nerfs as anything different as a general principle, just a matter of timing. Exceptions like Herald of the Titans and Challenge modes are just that, exceptions where difficulty is effectively locked in place. But that’s not the case for the vast majority of the game and I’m not sure it should be the case for raiding.

Do you think challenge mode type scaling should be applied to older raid tiers within the same expansion (aka, scale down players to 502 max for heroic vaults or something similar)? If not, why not?

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