Psynister’s Notebook: How And Why To Give Your Toons Hand Me Downs

by on November 22, 2010


So you know when you got given the dog-eared hand me down jumper that’s been in the family for generations and is made of something you don’t want to speculate on but you swear moves of its own accord that you just had to wear it, at least once. Even though the sleeves were twice the length of the rest of the thing and fell down no matter how tightly you rolled them up. Right? But there’s something magical about hand me down clothes. Sure, there’s something a lot of other things about them too that we’re not going to go into, but Psynister is writing a series recounting the benefits of hand me down clothing.

In World of Warcraft.

No, stick with us. His series is a great idea for anyone who’s thinking of startng a new character no matter how long you’ve been playing the game. It applies to both newish and veteran players just about to roll another toon and find out if they warm to it. And his idea of creating a wardrobe of hand-me-downs (which he calls HMDs) that your characters can share to get off the ground is a great one. He’s not talking about heirlooms: he’s talking about preparing sets of equipment that doesn’t bind to a character and you can ship to any new toon you fancy. Just so they have something to run around in while you get an idea of how they play, and so they can smite things without getting chilly.

So if you’re trying to decide on which class to role, or what to go take one for a test drive for 10 levels or so before deciding whether or not to keep them, this is a great way to get a feel for how the class is going to play for you without putting in investment that’s going to be wasted. Since these items can be passed around due to their lack of binding, it’s not a big deal to roll a character, gain a few levels, scrap them and reroll another, and so on until you find a nice fit.

He explains why you’d want to do this better than me, in his posts.  In his series he’s taking a look at gear sets for specific classes, some of which can then be shared for similar classes – like mages and warlocks need roughly the same stuff, at least at first. He suggests items to get, and then enchants to put on them. Why? He says that enchants are actually more effective than heirlooms. The only downside to this is that you need a character capable of providing some capital for this venture so it’s probably not accessible for very new players, but overall it looks like a greay longterm investment for anyone looking to try new classes. And I’d guess that’s most of us after, say, tomorrow (or whenever patch 4.0.3a does drop).

What about you – going to try this out or sticking with heirlooms for your new critter?

Quote taken directly from Psynister’s post, one of a series

You can find Psynister’s Notebook here, which is also where the rest of the posts in the series are.

If you enjoyed this article, check out our other posts from these categories: World of Warcraft

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Psynister November 23, 2010 at 2:49 am

Another bit of a side benefit to doing this is that when you use RAF with a brand new player, or just get a friend to sign up and take it for a spin, you can lend them your HMD’s as well. You can’t share your heirlooms, but you can share your HMD’s.
There are four other people that I know and play with fairly frequently that have access to my HMD supply on my bank alt so that they can take advantage of them as well.

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