We Fly Spitfires: A LFD System That De-Shells Players?

by on July 19, 2010


There’s a wailin’  going up just over the horizon; Gordon at WeFlySpitfires recently posted his reckonings on the LFD group system. But he wasn’t a grouse; rather than droning on about how it was back in the old days of 2009, Gordon’s turned out a LFD lament that I can relate to.[pullquote]I’m no psychologist it’s true (please don’t tell the veterans hospital where I moonlight on the weekends)[/pullquote]

Why? Two simple things.

Firstly, he’s pared the Matter To Hand with LFD random groups down into a couple of sentences and then not got the lugubriously-stringed violin out. Titan makers know, it’s tempting to bemoan the state of the game – particularly the LFD tool – just because we’re fed up with it, but Gordon’s managed to avoid gnashing his teeth.

Secondly, crucially, he’s made suggestions. Gordon’s made fitting suggestions – take note, devs – aimed at encouraging players to break down the LFD problems. I completely agree with his suggestions – a cross-realm friends list is something my guild and I have thought for a while would be extremely useful, given how we tend to recruit.

That said I was a little taken aback on one count. The RealFailID palava is still fresh enough that I generally expect to see suspicious derisions of it rather than positive statements. I was a little surprised that Gordon waved a flag for RealID fairly early in his post. A very small and fairly well-disclaimered flag, but nonetheless, I wasn’t expecting it. Given the epic pilings-on that RealID has recently attracted, I wondered if I might be filing this one under “he knew the risks”. But no – the post’s attracted a lot of support. Interesting.

What do you think? Have we all done the LFD complaints to death, or is there some hope for change implementation if we put the violins away and strike up conversation?

Quote direct from linked post. You can fly the WeFlySpitfires homepage here.

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{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

We Fly Spitfires July 19, 2010 at 8:47 pm

I'm a big advocate for grouping or rather more precisely, the grouping experience. There's nothing quite like sitting around a virtual campfire with a bunch of other players (old or new) and engaging in a bit of friendly banter. I think WoW player's are a little shy in this area but there's definitely a few things we could do to encourage people to come out of their shells some more :)

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Malevica July 19, 2010 at 9:00 pm

It's always nice to see positive or constructive commentary, and especially so at the moment when there's a noticeable lull in WoW and a lot of people are experiencing frustrations of one type or another.

Keep highlighting these please!

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Rebecca Judd July 19, 2010 at 9:39 pm

@Malevica – Roger! You're right, positive reading is good – it can have a ripple effect. I'm hoping that by highlighting some positive reads we'll see a few more positive commentaries/creative suggestions pop up. Not to say thre aren't any already!

@We Fly Spitfires – Quite right. I've not so much experience of how social other games are but some of my best WoW memories are of random chats with strangers in pre-LFD PUGs.

I might be in the minority here but I wonder sometimes if I prefered the hoooours long wait time for TBC Heroics. Sure, the wait was long, but you ended up with people who all had an (albeit slightly vested) interest in at least being polite, and whom you could keep in contact with afterwards.

I also think there's something to be said for, back then, the effort that putting a group together required. I did it regularly; whispering whole lists of /who names to find tanks and healers. It feels to me that when the need for that was removed from the game there was generally less need for putting effort in to groups/PUGs. What do you think? Anyone and everyone welcome on this, it's been a bee in my bonnet for a while.

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Grimnur July 20, 2010 at 6:51 am

I for my part like the random dungeons a lot. The reason for that is simple. I'm a casual player. And when I say casual then I mean it. In the past I really wanted to play as part of a dungeon group or a raid group. But whenever I finally found a group I had to go offline.

Additionally, in my experience, you can meet quite some nice folks in random groups. Some people actually had so much fun that they considered changing realms just to be part of the nice community within my guild. Sure, that's rare, but it happend.

I understand your reasons not to like it, but I do like it and I hope you understand my reason as well.

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